Here's what RDO enthusiasts have been blogging about over the last week or so:

Chasing the trunk, but not too fast by amoralej

As explained in a previous post, in RDO Trunk repositories we try to provide packages for new commits in OpenStack projects as soon as possible after they are merged upstream. This has a number of advantages:

Read more at http://tm3.org/c9

Enabling nested KVM support for a instack-virt-setup deployment. by Carlos Camacho

The following bash snippet will enable nested KVM support in the host when deploying TripleO using instack-virt-setup.

Read more at http://tm3.org/ca

Ocata OpenStack summit 2016 - Barcelona by Carlos Camacho

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to attend to the Barcelona OpenStack summit ‘Ocata design session’ and this post is related to collect some overall information about it. In order to achieve this, I’m crawling into my paper notes to highlight the aspects IMHO are relevant.

Read more at http://tm3.org/cb

On communities: Emotions matter by Flavio Percoco

Technology is social before it's technical - Gilles Deleuze

Read more at http://tm3.org/cc

New TLS algorithm priority config for libvirt with gnutls on Fedora >= 25 by Daniel Berrange

Libvirt has long supported use of TLS for its remote API service, using the gnutls library as its backend. When negotiating a TLS session, there are a huge number of possible algorithms that could be used and the client & server need to decide on the best one, where “best” is commonly some notion of “most secure”. The preference for negotiation is expressed by simply having an list of possible algorithms, sorted best to worst, and the client & server choose the first matching entry in their respective lists. Historically libvirt has not expressed any interest in the handshake priority configuration, simply delegating the decision to the gnutls library on that basis that its developers knew better than libvirt developers which are best. In gnutls terminology, this means that libvirt has historically used the “DEFAULT” priority string.

Read more at http://tm3.org/cd

New libvirt website design by Daniel Berrange

The current previous libvirt website design dated from circa 2008 just a few years after the libvirt project started. We have grown alot of content since that time, but the overall styling and layout of the libvirt website has not substantially changed. Compared to websites for more recently launched projects, libvirt was starting to look rather outdated. So I spent a little time to come up with a new design for the libvirt website to bring it into the modern era. There were two core aspects to the new design, simplify the layout and navigation, and implement new branding.

Read more at http://tm3.org/ce

Quick Guide: How to Plan Your Red Hat Virtualization 4.0 Deployment by Eric D. Schabell

On August 24th of this year Red Hat announced the newest release of Red Hat Virtualization (RHV) 4.0.

Read more at http://tm3.org/cf

Visualizing Kolla’s Ansible playbooks with ARA by dmsimard

Kolla is an OpenStack deployment tool that’s growing in popularity right now.

Read more at http://tm3.org/cg

Recapping OpenStack Summit Barcelona by Peter Pawelski, Product Marketing Manager, Red Hat OpenStack Platform

More than 5,200 OpenStack professionals and enthusiasts gathered in Barcelona, Spain to attend the 2016 OpenStack Summit. From the keynotes to the break-out sessions to the marketplace to the evening events and the project work sessions on Friday, there was plenty to keep attendees busy throughout the week. In fact, if you were one of the lucky ones who attended OpenStack Summit, there was probably many sessions and activities you wanted to make it to but couldn’t.

Read more at http://tm3.org/ch