I've been out for a few weeks, but the blog posts from the community kept coming.

Containers on the CERN cloud by Tim Bell

We have recently made the Container-Engine-as-a-Service (Magnum) available in production at CERN as part of the CERN IT department services for the LHC experiments and other CERN communities. This gives the OpenStack cloud users Kubernetes, Mesos and Docker Swarm on demand within the accounting, quota and project permissions structures already implemented for virtual machines.We shared the latest news on the service with the CERN technical staff (link). This is the follow up on the tests presented at the OpenStack Barcelona (link) and covered in the blog from IBM.

Read more at http://tm3.org/d6

ANNOUNCE: New libvirt project Go XML parser model by Daniel Berrange

Shortly before christmas, I announced the availability of new Go bindings for the libvirt API. This post announces a companion package for dealing with XML parsing/formatting in Go. The master repository is available on the libvirt GIT server, but it is expected that Go projects will consume it via an import of the github mirror, since the Go ecosystem is heavilty github focused (e.g. godoc.org can’t produce docs for stuff hosted on libvirt.org git)

Read more at http://tm3.org/d7

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 is here! So what’s new? by Marcos Garcia - Principal Technical Marketing Manager

It’s that time of the year. We all look back at 2016, think about the good and bad things, and wish that Santa brings us the gifts we deserve. We, at Red Hat, are really proud to bring you a present for this holiday season: a new version of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, version 10 (press release and release notes). This is our best release ever, so we’ve named it our first Long Life release (up to 5 years support), and this blog post will show you why this will be the perfect gift for your private cloud project.

Read more at http://tm3.org/d8

Comparing OpenStack Neutron ML2+OVS and OVN – Control Plane by russellbryant

We have done a lot of performance testing of OVN over time, but one major thing missing has been an apples-to-apples comparison with the current OVS-based OpenStack Neutron backend (ML2+OVS).  I’ve been working with a group of people to compare the two OpenStack Neutron backends.  This is the first piece of those results: the control plane.  Later posts will discuss data plane performance.

Read more at http://tm3.org/d9